6 Facts About Oropharyngeal Dysphagia
The swallowing complications of a dysphagia diagnosis are typically pinpointed within two types of anatomical occurrences: oropharyngeal (“high dysphagia”), relating to a neurological problem in the mouth and/or throat; or esophageal (“low dysphagia”), relating to a physical problem in the esophagus, often aggravated by a blockage or irritation.1

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Categories - Disease States, Dysphagia Treatment, Professionals Blog, Research
14 Facts About Parkinson’s Disease and Dysphagia
As a neurological disorder, Parkinson’s disease (PD) has been shown to affect motor skills in the limbs, inhibit muscle coordination, and sometimes contribute to dysphagia. Because lack of awareness of swallowing difficulty, as well as silent aspiration, are not uncommon in PD, it is critical to monitor weight and provide counseling regarding signs and symptoms of swallowing difficulty even to individuals who report no swallowing difficulties.

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Categories - Disease States, Dysphagia Treatment, Professionals Blog, Research
9 Facts about Stroke Patients and Dysphagia
Research indicates that there is a high incidence of dysphagia after stroke and its episodic consequences are well documented for their detrimental nutritional and health effects.1 Emerging evidence also confirms that early detection of dysphagic symptoms in stroke patients can help to reduce the severity of the disorder, shorten the length of hospital stays, and help dysphagic stroke patients enjoy a higher quality of life.2

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Categories - Disease States, Dysphagia Treatment, Professionals Blog, Research